Benefits of Iron Infusions In Atlanta, GA

Benefits of Iron Infusions In Atlanta , GA

Benefits of Iron Infusions In Atlanta GA

An iron infusion is an effective treatment for iron deficiency.  Iron deficiency can cause fatigue, memory problems, shortness of breath, hair loss, and changes in skin color.  Iron is one of the minerals in the human body. It is one of the components of hemoglobin, the substance in red blood cells that helps blood carry oxygen throughout the body. Iron is needed to make red blood cells or hemoglobin which carries oxygen from the lungs to the muscles, tissues, and organs. If you do not have enough iron, your body cannot make hemoglobin.  Low iron levels cause tiredness and affect your ability to function. As the iron stores become depleted, the hemoglobin level drops, and this is called iron deficiency anemia.

An infusion is a method used to treat iron deficiency. The purpose of an iron infusion is to improve the iron deficit by directly replenishing the body’s iron stores. An iron infusion can quickly raise iron and hemoglobin levels, unlike iron pills or oral  supplements.

 

What are the symptoms of iron anemia?

There are several symptoms that may occur in all types of anemia. They are:

  • Feeling tired

  • Paleness

  • Difficulty breathing

  • Fast heartbeat

  • Dizziness

  • Headache

  • Feeling cold (including the sensation that your hands and feet are colder than usual)

  • Infections (caused by problems with the immune system).

How to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia?

If you think you might have iron deficiency anemia, see your doctor. He or she will ask you questions about your medical history and symptoms. Your doctor will also order blood tests to check your hemoglobin levels. A low hemoglobin level is the main sign of this condition. If your hemoglobin level is low, your doctor will order more blood tests to find out the cause. The most common cause of iron deficiency anemia is blood loss.

 

What causes iron-deficiency anemia?

Iron deficiency anemia has many possible causes. The most common cause is blood loss. Blood loss can be caused by:

Heavy menstrual periods

Gastrointestinal bleeding (from ulcers, tumors, or other conditions)

Inherited disorders that cause abnormal bleeding

Cancer (including cancer of the uterus, stomach, colon, or rectum)

Other possible causes of iron deficiency anemia include:

Pregnancy

Childbirth

Lactation (breast-feeding)

Poor absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract (due to surgery, certain medications, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, or ulcerative colitis)

Inadequate iron in the diet

Chronic kidney disease

Excessive sweating

Certain parasitic infections (such as hookworm)

 

What are the complications of iron deficiency anemia?

If left untreated, iron deficiency anemia can cause problems such as: 

  • Heart problems: Iron is needed for the heart to pump blood properly. If you don’t have enough iron, your heart cannot pump efficiently and you may develop heart failure.

  • Pregnancy complications: Iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy can lead to preterm labor and low birth weight babies. It can also increase the risk of maternal mortality (death).

  • Cognitive problems

Who is most likely to develop iron deficiency anemia?

 

  • Women who have heavy menstrual periods

  • Pregnancy because the need for iron intake greatly increases

  • Recent GI bleeding such as from ulcers and other GI diseases like Irritable Bowel and Crohn’s Disease

  • Those who eat a poor diet with low iron or have trouble absorbing iron like gastric by-pass patients

  • Patients on blood thinners such as aspirin, Plavix®, Coumadin®, or heparin

  • Patients taking medications that interfere with the ability of the body to absorb iron

  • Blood loss from surgery

  • Those who can’t take iron by mouth due to side effects

 

 

How is iron deficiency anemia treated?

The most common treatment for iron deficiency anemia is taking iron supplements. However, if you have trouble swallowing pills or if your body can’t absorb enough iron from supplements, your doctor may recommend iron infusions. Iron infusions are usually given through a vein (intravenously) in a hospital or clinic setting.

How to prevent iron anemia?

  • Diagnose and stop the source of bleeding or iron loss if this is causing your hemoglobin and hematocrit to drop.

  • Eating foods that are high in iron such as spinach, red meat, and beans

  • Cooking in iron pots and pans can also help to increase the amount of iron in food

  • Taking oral iron supplements as recommended by a physiciora

Benefits of Iron Infusions

 What are the symptoms of iron anemia?

There are several symptoms that may occur in all types of anemia. They are:

  • Feeling tired
  • Paleness
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Fast heartbeat
  • Dizziness
  • Headache
  • Feeling cold (including the sensation that your hands and feet are colder than usual)
  • Infections (caused by problems with the immune system).

How to diagnose iron-deficiency anemia?

If you think you might have iron deficiency anemia, see your doctor. He or she will ask you questions about your medical history and symptoms. Your doctor will also order blood tests to check your hemoglobin levels. A low hemoglobin level is the main sign of this condition. If your hemoglobin level is low, your doctor will order more blood tests to find out the cause. The most common cause of iron deficiency anemia is blood loss.

What causes iron-deficiency anemia?

Iron deficiency anemia has many possible causes. The most common cause is blood loss. Blood loss can be caused by:

Heavy menstrual periods

Gastrointestinal bleeding (from ulcers, tumors, or other conditions)

Inherited disorders that cause abnormal bleeding

Cancer (including cancer of the uterus, stomach, colon, or rectum)

Other possible causes of iron deficiency anemia include:

Pregnancy

Childbirth

Lactation (breast-feeding)

Poor absorption of iron from the gastrointestinal tract (due to surgery, certain medications, Crohn’s disease, celiac disease, or ulcerative colitis)

Inadequate iron in the diet

Chronic kidney disease

Excessive sweating

Certain parasitic infections (such as hookworm)

 

What are the complications of iron deficiency anemia?

If left untreated, iron deficiency anemia can cause problems such as: 

  • Heart problems: Iron is needed for the heart to pump blood properly. If you don’t have enough iron, your heart cannot pump efficiently and you may develop heart failure.
  • Pregnancy complications: Iron deficiency anemia during pregnancy can lead to preterm labor and low birth weight babies. It can also increase the risk of maternal mortality (death).
  • Cognitive problems

Who is most likely to develop iron deficiency anemia?

  • Women who have heavy menstrual periods
  • Pregnancy because the need for iron intake greatly increases
  • Recent GI bleeding such as from ulcers and other GI diseases like Irritable Bowel and Crohn’s Disease
  • Those who eat a poor diet with low iron or have trouble absorbing iron like gastric by-pass patients
  • Patients on blood thinners such as aspirin, Plavix®, Coumadin®, or heparin
  • Patients taking medications that interfere with the ability of the body to absorb iron
  • Blood loss from surgery
  • Those who can’t take iron by mouth due to side effects

 

How is iron deficiency anemia treated?

The most common treatment for iron deficiency anemia is taking iron supplements. However, if you have trouble swallowing pills or if your body can’t absorb enough iron from supplements, your doctor may recommend iron infusions. Iron infusions are usually given through a vein (intravenously) in a hospital or clinic setting.

How to prevent iron anemia?

  • Diagnose and stop the source of bleeding or iron loss if this is causing your hemoglobin and hematocrit to drop.
  • Eating foods that are high in iron such as spinach, red meat, and beans
  • Cooking in iron pots and pans can also help to increase the amount of iron in food
  • Taking an iron supplement as recommended by a physician

 

Iron infusion vs. iron injection

Iron infusions involve delivering a dose of iron through the vein with an IV drip. Iron injections involve injecting iron into a muscle with a needle. The injection is usually done into the buttocks. Iron infusions may take an hour or more, whereas iron injections deliver a whole dose immediately.

Iron infusions tend to be less painful than iron injections. Injections can also cause intramuscular bleeding and orange discoloration. Because of these possible complications, doctors often favor iron infusions over iron injections as a treatment for iron deficiency anemia.

Iron infusions are an effective treatment for iron deficiency anemia than iron supplements or prescriptions.

What is an Iron infusion treatment?

An infusion is a method used to treat iron deficiency. The purpose of an iron infusion is to improve the iron deficit by directly replenishing the body’s iron stores. An iron infusion can quickly raise iron and hemoglobin levels, unlike iron pills or supplements.

Benefits of Iron Infusions

 

Iron infusions are usually administered by doctors to treat iron deficiency anemia. In addition to an iron IV, the doctor may prescribe an iron pill and recommended the consumption of iron-rich foods like liver and black molasses. If you are suffering from iron deficiency anemia in Atlanta, GA, contact Taylor Medical Wellness Group. We offer iron infusion treatments to help improve your iron levels and overall health.

 

Iron infusion is a treatment in which iron is delivered to your body intravenously ( in the vein). A very small needle is used to introduce a small plastic catheter into the vein. Once the catheter is inserted, the needle is removed so the patient is free to move around since there is no needle present in the vein. The catheter is attached to a long tube that is connected to an IV bag of normal saline containing iron. The iron solution then slowly flows into your vein. A typical infusion takes about an hour. You may need more than one infusion to raise your hemoglobin levels to normal levels.

 

What should I expect during my appointment for an infusion?

You will have a brief physical exam. This will help us check your vital signs and make sure you are feeling well enough for the infusion. You will then be asked to sign a consent form. Once you are comfortable, an IV will be started in your arm. The iron will be slowly infused over 1-2 hours. During this time, you will be able to read, listen to music or just relax. It is important to drink.

How long does an infusion take?

An iron infusion can take from 45 minutes to a couple of hours depending on the type of iron and the milligrams to be administered. Iron transfusion using dialysis can take several hours while IV infusion takes last time.

It often takes several infusions to bring the body’s iron levels up to the appropriate levels. You will receive iron infusions over the course of one or a few weeks for your treatments. Iron infusions take time and can be more expensive than other types of anemia treatments. The more severe your iron anemia is the more milligrams of iron you will need especially if you have an upcoming surgery.

 

When will my hemoglobin go up?

Your hemoglobin will not increase immediately after an infusion. It can take several weeks or months for your hemoglobin to reach normal levels. In the meantime, you may need additional infusions or blood transfusions to help increase your hemoglobin levels.

How many Infusions will I need?

The number of infusions you will need depends on the severity of your anemia and how much iron you need to raise your levels. In most cases, you will need one or two infusions per week for several weeks to improve your iron levels. It is important to follow up with your doctor after receiving an infusion to make sure that your iron levels have increased sufficiently.

How Long Does It Take to feel better after an iron infusion?

It usually takes a few days to a week for patients to start feeling better after an iron infusion. Some may experience fatigue and other symptoms for a few weeks as their body adjusts to the new level of iron. It is important to follow up with your doctor after an infusion to make sure that your iron levels have increased sufficiently.

What should I expect after an iron infusion?

After an iron infusion, you will be closely monitored for any reactions. You will likely remain in the infusion center for 30 to 60 minutes after the infusion is completed so that staff can watch for any adverse reactions. You may experience some minor

When you should start to feel better depends on your particular situation. Normally, it may take from a week to a month after you start your iron supplement before you start to feel better. Continue to watch your symptoms and take note of side effects that might be caused by the supplements. If you have any questions or concerns, talk to your healthcare provider.

Side effects and complications of infusions

Most people do not experience any side effects from iron infusions. Some people may feel nauseous or dizzy during or immediately after the infusion. If this occurs, it is usually because the infusion is being given too quickly. The infusion can also cause pain or a burning sensation at the site where the needle was inserted.

The most common side effect of iron infusion is feeling flushed or hot during the infusion. If side effects occur, they are usually very mild and may include headaches, nausea, vomiting, shortness of breath, change in taste of food, increased or decrease blood pressure, and itching. These side effects usually go away within 30 minutes. More serious side effects include chest pain, irregular heartbeat, and seizures.

Iron infusion is generally a safe treatment. After the infusion, you can return to your normal activities. You can drive immediately after an infusion and can return to work.

What is the cost of an iron infusion?

The cost of an infusion can vary depending on the type of iron used, the milligrams administered, the length of the infusion, and the facility where you receive the infusion. The average cost of an infusion is between $300 and $500. Check with your insurance provider to see what coverage you have for iron infusions.